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10 Home-Run Hotel Packages for Baseball Fans

10 Home-Run Hotel Packages for Baseball Fans


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From Cracker Jacks to memorabilia, these hotels show extra love to traveling baseball fans

When you live a short drive’s distance from your favorite baseball team’s home field, it can be anxiety-inducing when they go on the road. Where are you supposed to watch the game? Do they really expect you to do so on some supposedly “HD” TV? You are used to live action, smelling the players’ sweat, and feeling the rush of competition. You are going to be right by their side through thick and thin — even if that means traveling to San Francisco, Boston, and Chicago all summer long. You’re a giver.

Lucky for you hotels across the country are showing some extra love for traveling baseball fans by offering packages geared toward their very wants and needs. Heading to watch the San Diego Padres? The Omni Hotel San Diego will deliver fresh apple pie to your room. San Francisco Giants calling your name? Stay at the Powell Hotel in a sumptuous Junior Suite reserved just for baseball-lovers. One thing these hotels don’t stipulate is having to be a fan of the home team, so if you’re a supporter of the visiting team, just enjoy the pie and maybe don’t practice your team’s cheers in the lobby.

Anyone heading to Boston to see a Red Sox game should book the Baseball Suite at the Commonwealth Hotel. It is fully decked out for the roving baseball fan with sophisticated (not kitschy) memorabilia, vintage baseball posters, and an impressive trading card collection. Did we mention the classic baseball movie collection and iconic stadium snacks like Cracker Jacks and glass Coca Cola bottles?

With amenities like these and baseball fever getting into full swing for the season, you may even be inspired to plan a baseball stadium tour this summer. Did someone say road trip?

Click here to see the 10 Hotel Packages for Baseball Fanatics Slideshow.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


Cooperstown

It would have been fine if Max Sanford hadn’t dropped the ball.

But the New Yorker did, just as the blue-uniformed Neal Farren was closing in on him, and he got pinched. The authorities were not amused: It cost Sanford a thousand bucks to get back in the game, and that was during Prohibition, when a buck was actual money.

Lesson: If you’re going to buy a load of rubber baseballs at 55 cents a dozen, hollow them out, fill each with 15 cents worth of mixed booze and sell them as “Baseball Cocktails” on 14th Street for 50 cents a pop, when a cop comes up to see what’s drawing the crowd, for God’s sake keep a tight grip on your product.

There used to be a good deal of overlap between the gents that liked to while away an idle afternoon at the ballgame and the ones that liked to lean against the bar and moisten the mortal clay with a cocktail or three. For a while there, Philadelphia even had a “Gin Cocktail Base Ball Club” (that might just be the edge that the Phillies need).

And yet—despite the best efforts of Mr. Sanford—there is no generally accepted, classic “Baseball Cocktail.” There’s not even a “Babe Ruth Cocktail.” If there were ever a man who didn’t think a drink was something to be avoided, it was The Sultan of Swat (he was famous for putting away a quart of whiskey and ginger ale with his breakfast).

Fortunately, there is one classic with which to toast the baseball season: the Cooperstown Cocktail. It was created at the old Waldorf-Astoria hotel back before Prohibition as a tribute to the sporting types from the famed upstate town who used to drop by when they were in the city. It includes gin, equal parts sweet and dry vermouth, orange bitters and mint leaves, and it’s the refreshment you want before, during or after a nine-inning day out.


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